Albums from Juno award-winning Canadian artists

Upgrade your playlist with these new tunes coming soon

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A collage of three album covers. The album cover of Blame My ex by The Beaches is divided into multiple squares of the same image: one of the band members with a platinum blonde bob and red varsity jacket half-smiling. Our roots run deep by Dominique Fils-Aimé features a closeup of Fils-Aime with dark green leaves in her braided, slick-back hair in front of a green backdrop. Prisms by G. R. Gritt features Gritt in an earthy tie dye shirt and beanie with an orange, fume-y atmosphere surrounding them.
PHOTOS: Courtesy of The Beaches, Ensoul Records, and Minotan Music

By: Hailey Miller, Staff Writer

The album cover of Blame My ex by The Beaches is divided into multiple squares of the same image: one of the band members with a platinum blonde bob and red varsity jacket half-smiling.
PHOTO: Courtesy of The Beaches

The BeachesBlame My Ex
Available September 15

Toronto-based alternative rock band, The Beaches, are about to release their anticipated album Blame My Ex. Pre-released singles, including “Everything is Boring,” “Blame Brett,” andWhat Doesn’t Kill You Makes You Paranoid,” hint at a strong taste of what’s to come. Though they have been around for a decade, it wasn’t until the past few years that they began making waves, and Blame My Ex will surely catch the attention of today’s rock-seekers

The Beaches’ modern approach to rock creates a distinguished sound that houses electrifying chords and riffs paired with a care-free attitude and catchy hooks. Not many artists in today’s industry can successfully accomplish this magnitude of talent while still creating their own path, and the hits on Blame My Ex are no exception.

The Beaches are paving the way for young women in rock, exemplifying the means to stand out in today’s music industry. Headlining tour dates in support of their forthcoming album take place later this fall, including their show on November 12 at the Orpheum. Check the band’s website for more details.

Our roots run deep by Dominique Fils-Aimé features a closeup of Fils-Aime with dark green leaves in her braided, slick-back hair in front of a green backdrop.
PHOTO: Courtesy of Ensoul Records

Dominique Fils-Aimé Our Roots Run Deep
Available September 22

French-Canadian R&B/jazz artist, Dominique Fils-Aimé’s album Our Roots Run Deep features 14 songs including pre-released singles. “Cheers to New Beginnings houses a raspy lead vocal accompanied by lilting harmonies. “My Mind at Ease explores the idea of omitting negative thoughts from one’s mind and coming to terms with being at peace with oneself. The latest single, “Feeling Like a Plant,” features soft drums and maracas, and a soulful rhythm evident of Fils-Aimé’s Haitian background. 

Our Roots Run Deep follows Fils-Aimé’s 2021 album trilogy, Three Little Words, which previously encompassed the exploration of African American music culture, femininity, and bringing forward change for the future. Her 2023 album is said to be somewhat of a spin-off of the previous trilogy, though this time with a more narrative approach to follow up her previous works. 

Fils-Aimé will surely continue creating powerful tracks to receive the recognition she deserves. Following the release of her album, she’s set to tour Québec and Ontario this October. More information is available on her website.

Prisms by G. R. Gritt features Gritt in an earthy tie dye shirt and beanie with an orange, fume-y atmosphere surrounding them.
PHOTO: Courtesy of Minotan Music

R. Gritt — Prisms 
Available October 13

Indigenous Two-Spirit artist, G. R. Gritt’s second album Prisms is full of queer love songs and powerful storytelling of unity within art. The record showcases an up-beat electro-pop influence with catchy grooves — an approach that’s quite different from the softer alternative, blues, and folk directions in their previous works. 

Their latest single, “Our Names,” featuring spoken word poet Smokii Sumac, features catchy drumming, smooth vocals, a subtle record scratch, and hip-hop influences. It’s sure to get stuck in your head and have you up and dancing right from the first beat. “There is medicine in singing and sharing our truths. I wanted to find a way to encourage understanding and empathy for our lived experiences,” Gritt said.

Prior to the release of “Our Names,” Gritt’s single “Turnin’ It Up” feat. Tessa Balaz (the first that was released off of Prisms) also features electro hip-hop elements that display their crossover in genres. Each single is an easy listen that gets you in the groove. More information regarding the Prisms release is available on Gritt’s website

Listen to The Peak’s regularly-updated “Peak Discovery” playlist on our Spotify profile, featuring an eclectic mix of rising Canadian artists.

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